2005 Chevy SSR

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, 2-passenger, 2-door convertible

ENGINE TYPE: pushrod 16-valve V-8, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection

Displacement: 364 cu in, 5967cc

Power (SAE net): 390 bhp @ 5400 rpm

Torque (SAE net): 405 lb-ft @ 4400 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 6-speed manual

DIMENSIONS:

Wheelbase: 116.0 in Length: 191.4 in Width: 78.6 in Height: 64.2 in

Curb weight: 4746 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS:

Zero to 60 mph: 5.5 sec

Zero to 100 mph: 14.1 sec

Street start, 5-60 mph: 6.6 sec

Standing 1/4-mile: 14.1 sec @ 100 mph

Top speed (governor limited): 125 mph

Braking, 70-0 mph: 185 ft

Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.82 g

EPA fuel economy, city driving: 13 mpg

The 5.3-liter V-8 found in the original 2003 models has been replaced with a 6.0-liter LS2 V-8 that churns out 390 horsepower and 405 pound-feet of torque. It’s the same engine found under the hood of the Corvette. A four-speed automatic also found in the Corvette is the standard transmission. The SSR Car and Driver tested in September 2003 took a leisurely seven seconds to go from 0 to 60 mph. This 2005 model, performed that task in 5.5 seconds. The 0-to-100-mph time was even more impressive. The new SSR whacked six seconds off the previous car’s time and reached the century number in just 14.1 seconds. The quarter-mile ET and speed went from 15.4 seconds at 89 mph to 14.1 seconds at 100 mph. These are respectable numbers that put the SSR in the same league with more conventional roadsters like the BMW Z4, Honda S2000, and Nissan 350Z when it comes to straight-line acceleration.

Chevrolet also enhanced a few other things in the revised SSR, most notably the steering system, which now has a retuned valve assembly and new bearings and seals for more precise on-center feel and a reduction in steering effort. The steering does feel a bit more accurate, and it’s easier to maneuver the SSR around town, but the truck still isn’t any fun for slaloming through corners. Push the SSR, and its truck roots are quickly revealed by its bouncy ride. The SSR pulled 0.82 g on the skidpad and stopped from 70 mph in 185 feet, the same distance as the one tested in 2003.

Amazingly, despite the added 90 horsepower, one thing that hasn’t significantly changed on the SSR is its sticker price. The first SSR tested had a base price of $41,995; this latest 390-hp version starts at $43,180. It’s easy to pile on expensive options, though.

We won’t argue with the SSR’s eye-candy value or its ability to attract lots of attention.

 

Condition: Used
Exterior Color: Blue
Interior Color: Black
Transmission: Automatic
Engine: 6 L
Year: 2005

Our Price: $24,950